New Show at Jean Bragg Fine Arts in New Orleans
A new show titled "Shoreline and Wetlands, Two Perspectives" by Melissa Smith and Rhea Gary will be on display at Jean Bragg Fine Arts on Julia Street in New Orleans though the month of June, 2015. The opening is from 6-9pm, Saturday, April 4th.


Rhea Gary again voted Best Visual Artist in the fourth annual “Best Of” 225 Awards.
Gary’s hyper-saturated oil landscapes emerged as the clear winner of “in-the-know” readers of Baton Rouge’s premier magazine “225". Gary’s artwork is not just local. It hangs in galleries and collections in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and South America, as well. A true Louisianan, Gary focuses on the unique and lovely vistas of her home state for inspiration as she seeks to capture the state’s fragile beauty. She also works closely with America’s Wetland Foundation in efforts to bring attention the great need to take steps in restoring our wetlands, which are quickly vanishing.


Rusticks - Cashiers, NC
Rhea's work was recently shown at this high end decor & art gallery. http://www.rusticks.com


The Third Day of Creation
Jean Bragg Gallery of Southern Art in New Orleans, April 2009. Gary introduced a large selection of new work for this show which was held during the Jammin' on Julia 1st Saturday Art Walk. A portion of all sales benefited the America's WETLAND Foundation for marsh replanting, a subject very important to Gary. Some of her pieces from the show are still available at the gallery. For more information, contact Jean Bragg Gallery, 600 Julia Street, New Orleans, LA 504.895.7375, www.jeanbragg.com


Nature's Reflections
The Blue Diamond Gallery in Greensboro, NC, hosted a solo exhibit of Gary’s art during the month of April, 2008. The show featured over twenty pieces of her work.

For further information, contact The Blue Diamond Gallery, 604 S. Elm Street, 336.510.7509.


The Earth, the Sky, and the Sea
Coconut Grove Gallery in Coconut Grove, Florida, near Miami, recently hosted a month long show featuring Gary's work. It included a large number of pieces in her new Sunset Series. The remaning work is still on display in the gallery and she will continue to supply the gallery with new pieces in the future.
   


Marsh Mission travels to Wyoming
In September the Marsh Mission exhibit traveled to Wyoming to for a special exhibition at the National Museum of Wildlife Art. This museum, distinguished by its mission, is located in Jackson Hole and overlooks the 20,000 acre National Elk Refuge near the Grand Teton National Park. Rhea and CC traveled to the exhibit where both were invited to guest lecture. Rhea also spent some time talking about the Marsh Mission at several area schools and CC led a session of a professional Wildlife photography course.

Sep 29, 2007 to Jan 27, 2008
National Museum of Wildlife Art, Jackson Hole, WY




January 11, 2007 - Washington, DC -- Vanishing Wetlands: Two Views is a new exhibit opening at the U.S. Botanic Garden on January 20, 2007. Organized by the LSU Museum of Art, the traveling exhibit showcases Louisiana's coastal parishes through paintings, photographs, and multi-media components. The exhibit is on display in the West Orangerie of the USBG Conservatory through May 13.

Vanishing Wetlands: Two Views illustrates the passion that two Baton Rouge artists share for the restoration of Louisiana's eroding coast and their desire to heighten public awareness of this environmental loss. Included are wildlife and wetlands photographs by C.C. Lockwood, a naturalist who has recorded the life of the rivers, bayous, and marshes of southern Louisiana for almost thirty years. Complementing Lockwood’s photographs are the dramatic and colorful oil paintings by Rhea Gary, his artistic collaborator. Together, they have documented the wetlands and its inhabitants to bring attention to a significant yet rapidly vanishing ecological and economic zone. This project also is the subject of a book, Marsh Mission: Capturing the Vanishing Wetlands (Louisiana State University Press, 2005).

Lockwood's photographs and Gary's paintings about the wetlands issue are timely: they are part of a larger state and national effort to bring attention to the phenomenon of coastal erosion, restoration, and management. The Vanishing Wetlands: Two Views exhibit exposes the scientific, social, and political impacts of coastal erosion and brings to light a glaring paradox -- what we see and understand to be a "picturesque" view of the wetlands region is greatly at odds with the vast coastal deterioration that is now occurring.

In conjunction with the exhibit, the artists will present lectures about vanishing wetlands and the Marsh Mission project. Both programs are free, but pre-registration is requested (call 202-226-4082 or visit www.usbg.gov):

Wednesday, January 24, 1:00-2:00 p.m.
Rhea Gary will discuss why wetlands loss is occurring and why it is essential to address marshland restoration now.

Thursday, January 25, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.
C.C. Lockwood will speak about his experiences creating the Vanishing Wetlands exhibit.

The U.S. Botanic Garden Conservatory and the adjacent National Garden are open to the public, free of charge, every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Conservatory is located at 100 Maryland Avenue SW, on the west side of the U.S. Capitol. Visitors are encouraged to take Metrobus and Metrorail. Further information is available by calling 202-225-8333 or visiting www.usbg.gov.



 
Vanishing Wetlands: Two Views

Organized and circulated by the LSU Museum of Art (LSU MOA)
October 28, 2005 to February 19, 2006

Opening Public Reception: Friday, October 28, at 7:30 p.m.

Vanishing Wetlands: Two Views illustrates the passion that two Baton Rouge artists share for the restoration of Louisiana's eroding coast and their desire to heighten public awareness. The exhibition exposes the scientific and social impacts of this environmental loss. It brings to light a glaring paradox - what we see and understand to be a "picturesque" view of the wetlands region is greatly at odds with the vast coastal deterioration that occurs underwater, hidden from view but well known to scientists.

The exhibition presents the documentary wildlife and wetlands photography of C.C. Lockwood, a naturalist who has recorded the life of the rivers, bayous, and marshes of South Louisiana for 30 years. It tracks episodes from his recent 2004 project, Marsh Mission. Lockwood and his artistic collaborator, painter Rhea Gary, spent a year touring the coastal waters on a houseboat, the Wetlands Wanderer, documenting the region and its inhabitants to bring attention to a significant yet rapidly vanishing ecological and economic zone.